The Remote Sensing Research Centre uses earth observation data, also called remotely sensed data, collected from ground, submarine, airborne and satellite sensors, along with field data and various processing algorithms and programming codes, to measure, map and monitor biophysical properties in terrestrial, atmospheric and aquatic environments. The information we produce is developed in association with scientists and managers to better understand and manage the earth’s environments and resources.

Our research provides private and public sector organisations with the techniques to turn satellite and airborne images and field survey data into meaningful maps or information for one or many points in time. These results can then be used to better understand where, how and why environments are changing, and to separate natural changes from those produced by humans.

 

We actively coordinate and lead Earth Observation activities in Australia and internationally to ensure the field continues to advance and that Australia and other countries can access EO data and analysis tools.

EO is essential environmental information for public and private agencies globally – our role is to develop and maintain access to this.

There are several formally established and funded groups that operate within the RSRC. These are complemented by several areas of activities where there is a critical mass of research of researchers.

We engage in three focus research areas :

  • Biophysical Remote Sensing
  • Image acquisition, Processing, Analysis and Visualisation
  • Communication, Sharing and Application

These cut across our four work programs, where we group our staff, students, funding and coordination:

  1. Centre research coordination and training
  2. Core projects
  3. Earth Observation Coordination
  4. Long term sustainability

The Remote Sensing Research Centre is located at the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences at The University of Queensland and was established in 1999 by Professor Stuart Phinn and is directed by Stuart and Dr Chris Roelfsema.